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What Nobody Wants You to Know About Customer Service Abroad

For those wanting to make a permanent “escape” from US, listen to these two threads about dealing with service abroad and realize this is what’s in store for you.

This is honestly every day life stuff.

I can’t even fathom the amount of hours I’ve wasted in the last two years.

‏Service Abroad Issue #1:

I ordered 3 items from Amazon (Germany) on Tuesday last week. I specifically said to put them into one package if possible. I was told they’d be here Friday.

In Europe, to get a package, YOU MUST BE HOME ALL DAY.

I was told the 3 items were gonna be in 2 packages, and that both would arrive FRIDAY.

So on THURSDAY afternoon, I miss a call. Turns out, it’s UPS trying to deliver Package A.

No text, email, or any kind of warning.

Naturally, because I was told FRIDAY, I wasn’t home.

I check Amazon’s site, and it says the Package B will be delayed by a few days. Okay, fine, whatever. Hopefully Package A will still come, right? So, of course, on Friday, I get a call, Package B is here! Naturally that means Package A, which was attempted to be delivered YESTERDAY, should be there too?

Right….?

Ha. Ha. Ha.

UPS has no idea where the thing is according to their tracking info.

I got to spend my afternoon emailing and calling UPS Germany in an attempt to sort it out.

And the end result?

I had to stay home an entire SECOND day so they could “try” to deliver again.

‏Service Abroad Issue #2:

A Russian company owes me a nice chunk of affiliate change…from January of this year. Their policy is to pay out on the 20th of following month, so February I should’ve been paid. But of course, there was a “change in management” that delayed it. And they delayed until March, then April, then May.

They kept citing that the bank transfers weren’t working, their policies changed, and that they COULDN’T USE PAYONEER anymore.

I asked since January for them to use Payoneer or PayPal.

And PayPal, certainly not in Russia.

Then, magically, June is here, they can pay me.

They ask me to update my bank info, I do.

Then I’m told “the wire info isn’t right” with my bank.

I call my bank.

It’s definitely correct.

Russian Company asks, “Can you use Payoneer?”

Me: “………………”

But sure, okay, Payoneer is fast.

I call Payoneer.

They can’t use the way I used to do it for less than $5,000, new policy. Just implemented last month. Meaning if Russian Company had paid me any time in the last 5 months they were supposed to, issue avoided. So, now I’m again stuck waiting (I gave them a new bank account info) for the “finance department” to approve a payment that should have been sent in February.

I reckon I will probably never see the money, and I should probably just write off as a sunk cost.

Now, now, I know what you’re thinking.

Yes, I sound like a spoiled child whose Amazon package didn’t come and didn’t get his passive income payment.

But, I am not joking when I say that this type of service abroad…it’s NORMAL, every day life situations out here.

Shit. Just. Doesn’t. WORK.

Shit. Just. Doesn’t. Get. DONE.

You start adding up all the hours spent waiting for the check in a restaurant.

Or every time it takes the waiter 15 minutes to even notice you.

Hours at home waiting for a package.

This is just how business works here.

Would I trade the hot girls, friendships, and general way of life in Europe?

Probably not…but I’ve had moments I’ve thought of going back.

But don’t kid yourself into thinking that every part of your move to another country will be easy-peasy and that you’ll never run out of patience with the service abroad.

Anyways, if you still want to get abroad for the sexy women and the high heels, at least arm yourself for reality.

“DANET” will teach you all the inner workings of them and teach you for life “beyond long legs and high heels”, so to speak:

https://DatingAbroad.net

  • Matt Lawrence says:

    My experience with restaurants in Kherson, Ukraine was a bit different. Somehow Ukrainians seem to be discovering capitalism. In Kherson there are lots of restaurants (and a few clubs) that have been remodeled and are really very nice. Add to that the fact that most of the places I went actually had good service, certainly as good as average places here in Texas.

    Since Kherson is a bit of a backwater city, I suspect it is a bit more indicative of the Ukrainian mindset that an international city like Kiev.

    Kherson is also home to Fabrika, a very large shopping mall. It looks really nice and has a huge selection of consumer goods. From my observations, Ukraine is very much on the economic upswing and they are getting the hang of business.

  • Big D says:

    So much for my stereotype about German efficiency….

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