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5 Reasons To Hit Up Language Exchanges If You Travel Abroad

  • June 24, 2017 /

In the last year and a half that I’ve live abroad, I’ve learned one thing over and over again—it sucks having to leave people behind. Good friends are hard to come by, and I’ve met quite a few of them during my nomadic time.

The problem is that when you’re moving every month, you’re inevitably going to be meeting, making, and then losing friends. Constantly. It’s enough to wear most people down, and in turn I think it results in more “permanent expats” rather than 24/7/365 nomadic travelers.

However, even if you settle into a place on at least a somewhat permanent basis, you run into another problem—often times, the people you want to meet (Red Pill aware and have their life together) are currently living that nomadic life.

You might meet a great wingman in your city, go out a half dozen times, then he packs his bags and leaves. This process gets rinsed and repeated constantly, depending on where you are in the world, the weather, etc.

Why Language Exchanges Are A Great Alternative

Over the last few months, I’ve been sporadically attending language exchanges in my “home base” city. Not because I have a huge work ethic to improve my Russian, but mostly just to socialize and have a good time.

I’ve found that it’s a fantastiavenue for socializing in multiple ways. I’d highly recommend it to anyone who lives abroad or spends considerable time in a country where English isn’t the native language spoken.

Without further ado, here are five reasons you ought to check out a language exchange. This post originally appeared here.

1. Instant Social Proof For Game

Short of becoming a rock star, I’ve been hard-pressed to find a quicker way to gain instant, alpha-of-the-group social status compared to a language exchange.

If you’re a native speaker, you are instantly going to be the highest value person in the world simply because you can communicate better than anyone else there (other than other native speakers).

Girls and guys are both going to try to engage you—be prepared to be talking and communicating the whole time. If you’re the only native speaker in a group of 10, you are never going to get a break.

Simply put, you have the most value of everyone in the room—so the girls are going to flock to you. Granted, it’s not a “seduction” environment. It’s going to require some finesse and game to get the girls from the exchanges on a 1-on-1 date.

Bonus: If you are actually living in the city on a somewhat permanent basis, this works even better in your favor. You won’t see the Stag parties overflowing a language exchange when they are only there for a weekend. Generally speaking, most people who attend these exchanges are staying for at least a little while.

2. Easy Flag Hunting

If you’re interested in adding a few new flags to your notch collection, you’d be hard pressed to find a better opportunity to meet your pick of new opportunities.

As long as you are in a reasonably sized and international city, there is one common thing most girls living there have in common—they want to improve their English. It’s usually the only language they can all communicate in.

I’ve never seen a wider range of girls from different countries all put together in one room, and easily approachable. Of course, this does come at a downside—there’s often quite the diversity of guys with bad game stinking up the joint.

However, this point is pretty much moot—as I mentioned above, if you’re a native speaker, you are the biggest prize there.

3. Making Friends

Last year, I got lonely at times. When I was constantly moving, there were times I didn’t have any guys to hang out with. No one to just go play pool or grab a beer with. This wears on you over time. Sometimes, it’s just the simple things in life.

Well, the language exchanges are also a great environment to meet some new buddies. Just screen carefully for the ones who have their lives together and aren’t spending their weekends marching in parades.

By nature, these nature exchanges promote a sense of “openness and accepting”, so there are plenty of Libtards waiting in the wings to attack you about Donald Trump.

Generally speaking, you’ll have something in common with the other native English speakers. They likely made the move from their home country abroad—so there’s common ground right there.

If you make buddies with some local foreign guys, even more doors can be opened in regards to local girls you might not normally have had access to.

4. Free Drinks (And A Warning)

Most hosts of language exchanges buy you a drink if you are a native speaker and go to the group where your native tongue is spoken. And they won’t be the only one who buy you a drink.

I’m not kidding—you can pretty much expect to drink for free as long as you are being a charmer and engaging everybody. They’ll make sure your glass is never empty.

 5. It’s Simply Good Fun

It gets exhausting, and I wouldn’t recommend going every week—but I’ve found language exchanges to simply be good fun. It’s a good reason to get out of the house on a random night, a good way to meet both buddies and girls, and it’s fun to be the most desired person in the world.

I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to any nomads living in reasonably large foreign cities. Start by browsing MeetUp, Facebook, and other social sites to find the best information. Find the best ones, and have fun.

To learn more about how to get these girls out on dates, check out my program on texting

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